Totally Turning Demonstrators

Totally Turning 2022 Demonstrators

Nick Cook | Ashley Harwood | Rudolph Lopez | Al Stirt | Craig Timmerman

Carl Ford | Lyle Jamieson | Paul Petrie | Ray Puffer | Alan Zenrich

Nick Cook
 

Nick Cook

Nationally known woodturner, Nick Cook lives in Marietta, Georgia, where he owns and operates his studio. He grew up around his father’s woodworking equipment and became interested in the art of woodturning in the mid-70s after several years in furniture design and manufacture.

A founding member of the American Association of Woodturners, Nick served six years on the board of directors, including one as vice president.

In addition to creating one-of-a-kind pieces and his staple gift items, Nick teaches and lectures on various woodturning topics, has written articles for several woodworking magazines, and produced two woodturning videos.

The primary materials that he now uses are maple, cocobolo, and tagua nuts. He employs a variety of woods, both domestic and exotic for his one-of-a-kind pieces. Nick’s work is marketed in gift shops and galleries from coast to coast and is included in numerous corporate and private collections. You can also find Nick selling his pieces at craft fairs in the Southeast.

Demonstrations

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Ashley Harwood

Ashley Harwood

I started woodturning when I took a bowl turning class with my dad in 2009. That same year, I applied for the Charleston Farmer’s Market to show and sell my work. A couple years later, I started teaching classes in my studio in Charleston, SC. I continued selling at the Farmer’s Market for seven years, and I continued teaching as well — both in my own studio and elsewhere, visiting woodturning clubs and demonstrating at symposiums all over the USA, in eight other countries, and as far away as Australia. I never would have guessed when I first started that woodturning and teaching would lead to such amazing experiences. Or that I would have met so many incredible and genuine people through my craft. Or how much teaching others would help to hone my own skills — in my craft and in life!

I now teach primarily in my home studio in Charleston SC. In recent years, I have been more focused on sharing my craft through social media – primarily through Instagram and Youtube. I believe that the most positive impact social media can have is to inspire, and I think the ability for people to share their own crafts and explore those of others plays a key role in this. I feel there is a resurgence in people working with their hands, and I love it!! I hope that my photos and videos might spark a creative interest in someone… or maybe, if I’m lucky, in a few people!

My most recent venture has been in designing my own line of turning tools. I strive to create only the highest quality tools and keep them all manufactured in the USA.

I am learning to stop saying “I never would have thought…”

Rudolph Lopez

Rudolph Lopez began his relationship with wood over 40 years ago as a craftsman of fine furniture and cabinetry. With an education in drafting and design and many years working as a professional photographer, the transition into woodturning has been a seamless flow into another creative endeavor.

“I have always had a love of nature and the natural beauty and inspiration it provides, and with that came my love of wood. I love everything about wood, rough or smooth it possesses a warm welcome feel. Wood has an unlimited potential for creativity but also flaws and faults, cracks, knots and other defects which sometimes makes it difficult to work with… this is my favorite kind of wood. I never cease to be amazed by the incredible amount of beauty to be found in it as I create a new turning.

My goal as an artistic turner is to bring out this hidden beauty which God and nature has provided and enhance it to create something that invites the eye and beckons the touch. I prefer simple shapes with sensuous flowing lines that showcase and reflect the natural beauty of the wood, thus becoming something to treasure for years to come”.

His energetic easy-going personality and his ability to explain woodturning techniques in a simple understandable manner has allowed Rudolph to share his skills and enthusiasm for woodturning along with his love of wood through teaching and demonstrating at symposiums, clubs, Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts and John C. Campbell Folk School as well as his studio in Tampa, Fl.
Website: http://rudolphlopez.com/

Demonstrations

Thin Stem Natural Edge Goblet from a Limb
We will be turning a thin stem natural edge goblet from a green limb approximately 1-1⁄2″ – 2″ diameter. I will show attendees the simple techniques I use to easily turn a thin stem natural edge goblet from a green limb using mostly a 1/2″ or 5/8″ side ground bowl gouge. I will explain limb selection, pith orientation, different techniques used for stabilizing thin stems, the use and sharpening of Negative Rake scrapers and drying to help avoid cracking.

Natural Edge End-Grain Vase
We will be turning a natural edge end grain vase from a green log using a bowl gouge and the Rolly Munro Hollower. I will explain limb selection, pith orientation and drying to help avoid cracking. We will cover the differences of cutting end-grain verses side-grain and using different end-grain hollowing methods. We will use the Rolly Munro Hollowing tool and discuss it verses the bowl gouge, scrapers or a hook tool along with the use and sharpening of the negative rake scraper. I will demonstrate how light can be used to gauge thickness, reverse jamb chucking to undercut and hollow the foot, and sanding wet wood on and off of the lathe.

Square to round Bowls, Vases and Hollow Forms
I will explain and demonstrate the process I use to create a bowl or vase, which is square on top and tapers to round at the bottom. Starting with a square or rectangular blank that has been prepared on a bandsaw to taper the sides, the remaining exterior corners will be turned leaving the four tapered sides previously cut on the band saw. Then the interior of the bowl or vase will be turned into the square top. The basics of bevel-supported cuts along with two of the most important fundamentals of turning—sharp tools and good tool control will be emphasized. I will demonstrate how and why this along with lathe speed affects how efficiently and cleanly interrupted edges can be turned safely. Techniques for sanding and/or embellishing the different surfaces of the forms will also be discussed. I will show a variety of ways blanks can be cut on the band saw which will start you thinking about how many different design possibilities there are for square to round bowls, vases and hollow forms. Attendees will learn the process I use to set-up and draw the layout of a design on the blank and how it is cut on the band saw and then oriented on the lathe to be turned. This demonstration will provide attendees with a several new creative ideas and open up many new design possibilities.

Al Stirt

Al Stirt

I consider myself a “bowl maker” more than a wood turner because, although the turning process fascinates me, it is the resulting bowl that commands my interest.

From the earliest times bowls have had meanings for people beyond the purely utilitarian. The bowl as vessel has a resonance deep within the human psyche.

I have always thought of each piece that I make as a composition utilizing elements of pattern, line, weight, texture and form. Even in the most simple pieces I try to find a harmony of grain and shape.

I seek a balance in my work between the dynamic and the serene. By playing with the tension created by combining the circle’s perfection with the energy of pattern I am trying to make pieces that have life.

I use patterns, whether created by grain structure or organic fluting and carving or repeated geometric shapes, to develop harmony in each of my pieces. I find myself always looking for a new means of expression within the turned form.

Demonstrations

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Craig Timmerman

Craig Timmerman

Craig Timmerman is a full-time artist and production woodturner living in Austin, TX. He is a nationally-known woodturner and gives demonstrations and woodturning instruction.

He picked up woodturning in 1998 when he took a weekend class at a local store. After that weekend the wood working equipment in his shop ceased to be used for anything except woodturning. He has now expanded into using bent lamination (the process of gluing of thin strips of wood and bending them under pressure over a form) to augment his turnings and to produce new and exciting pieces.

Craig’s specialties include hollow forms, spheres, and non-round (e.g. square) turnings. Many of his pieces combine multiple turnings and bent laminations. He works primarily with reclaimed timber–trees that have come down in storms, trees being taken down for construction, and the occasional piece of firewood. Reclaimed timber is often filled with flaws of different kinds, such as cracks, bug holes, or voids. Rather than try to remove the flaws, he accentuates them by making them the focal point of the piece, filling them with crushed stone, or carving them into other shapes.

Craig is a member of the American Association of Woodturners and the Central Texas Woodturners and is a firm believer in their mission to provide education and information to those interested in woodturning. Craig frequently demonstrates and teaches his craft. He has been a featured demonstrator three times at the American Association of Woodturners National Symposium as well as multiple regional woodturning symposiums, and local woodturning clubs.

Craig’s work is in several central Texas galleries and can also be found on his website. He also does a few art shows each year, including the Armadillo Christmas Bazaar – Austin’s oldest Christmas art show. He has been married to his wife Tina for over 30 years and they live just outside Austin with their two cats and two dogs. If life wasn’t busy enough, Craig also sings barbershop and a cappella music with a quartet and chorus.

Demonstrations

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Carl Ford

Carl Ford

Carl Ford is an accomplished full time studio woodturner who lives in Poughkeepsie NY.  He has been published numerous times in the AAW American Woodturner Journal and is well known for his colorful work.

Carl creates one of a kind turned, carved, burned and painted wood vessels.  His current passion is making plates and wide bowl bowls with big, bold, colorful, surface decoration. He also loves to turn natural edge bowls and vases.

The best place to see examples of Carl’s work is at “carlfordwoodturner” on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/carlfordwoodturner/ or “Carl Ford Woodturner” on Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/carl.ford.9235

Demonstrations

Wide Rim Wood Bowl with Spiraling Tool
Carl will show how to turn a 10″ diameter by 1-1/4″ tall wide rim bowl from air or kiln dried Hard Maple.  He will then show how to decorate the front with Sorby Spiraling Tool and wood dyes. The back will be natural with NO SANDING coves.

This demo will cover the following: Bowl turning – NO SANDING techniques – Sorby vs Crown Spiraling Tool – Large vs small spiraling tools – Spiraling vs texture wheels – How to use spiraling tools on side grain and get good results – Use of airbrush and Chroma Craft wood dyes.

 

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Web Effect Wide Rim Bowl with Spin Art
Carl will show how to turn a 10″ diameter by 1-1/2″ tall wide rim bowl from air or kiln dried Hard Maple.  He will then show how to decorate the front with wood dyes, web effect spray paint, spin art and acrylic paints.  The back will be natural with NO SANDING wire brush technique.

This demo will cover the following: Bowl turning – NO SANDING techniques – Use of airbrush and Chroma Craft wood dyes – Web effect spray paint and alternatives – How to “spin out” acrylic paint safely on the lathe –  Painting a spiral in the center of a bowl.

Lyle Jamieson

Lyle has been involved in both woodworking and turning from an early age. His father, a pattern maker in Detroit, mentored him in the intricacies of wood, both structural and artistic. As a result of this background, he got his start in the woodworking field.

Since 1988, from his home studio in Traverse City, Michigan, Lyle has turned his attention to woodturning and has quickly developed a style that is both innovative in design and technically challenging. While he began his work with traditional vessels and bowls, his creative energies and desire to cultivate his technique soon led him to attempt turning the human form. Requiring a multi-axis approach versus the more traditional single axis, the work is complex, yet delicate. The beauty of the human form allows the artist to employ grain elegantly.

Lyle developed a passion for woodturning around 1989. His quest for learning technical skills for woodturning led him to work with the best and most respected masters in the woodturning field. In 1998, Lyle became a full time studio turning artist/sculptor.

Demonstrations

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Paul Petrie

Paul Petrie


I have been a professional carpenter and woodworker for 30 yrs. My turning began with spindles for job sites, yet the fascination vessels and the after lathe work has brought me where I am today. My pieces have appeared in the American Association of Woodturners magazine, Fine Woodworking, Woodturning UK, and a cover and article in Woodworking in Action issue 16.

I have demonstrated at turning clubs and Totally Turning Symposium 2009, 2011. Individual instruction is available at my shop suited to students needs. My work has been purchased by individuals across the U.S. The lathe for me has opened a world of exploration into one of nature’s wonders, the tree. The complex combination of structure, grain, and texture work together to give the tree life and to produce beauty. I try in my way to use shape to expose this beauty and give pleasure to the eye. These shapes are preceded by grain orientation and angle to the rim.

More recently I have added forms of external change to my pieces as well. These forms include painting, piercing, wood burning and added texturing. All of these, I hope, add interest to the piece, yet it still remains a wood object.

Wood is a truly amazing medium and I am pleased to call myself a wood turner.

Demonstrations

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Ray Puffer

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Demonstrations

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Alan Zenrich

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